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I wanted to experiment with WSS, which gave me some issues with their automated setup through their control panel, but one little support ticket further, I got a WSS site running completely. On top of that, they went to all the necessary trouble of installing the Language templates for my language (Dutch)


So if you are still looking for some sharepoint hosting company, look no further and check out their site using the link below:



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StsadmWin: the Windows GUI for STSADM

One of the most frequently used utilities in SharePoint (2007 as well as 2003) is STSADM.Although highly improved in 2007, it maintains backward compatible with 2003 syntax.


As STSADM is a command line utility, and the command-line is somewhat limited compared to Windows GUI, especially when it comes to non-English usage, there is a room for GUIs like stsadmWin (STSADM for Windows).


Read all about it on Ronalus’ Blog at:


http://blogs.msdn.com/ronalus/archive/2007/01/04/stsadmwin-has-an-2007-version.aspx

Add a Copyright Statement to your MOSS site pages

If you need to add a copyright on the bottom of your MOSS Site pages, then you need to add this information to your Master Page. Now, I would suggest not to edit the default master page (Default.master), but copying it first like this:




  • Log on as a site collection administrator, and open the top site in a site collection


  • open the Master Page gallery: click site Actions -> Site Settings -> Modify all Site Settings, then click Master pages and page layouts


  • open an Explorer view of the library to make it easier to copy the origian Master Page: Click Actions -> Open with Windows Explorer


  • Right-Click on the Default.master fiel and select Copy, then right-click on any free space in the windo, right-click, and select Paste. Rename the copied file to DefaultWithCopyright.master.


  • Now apply this Master Page to SharePoint. Also apply the Master Page as a System Master page to ensure that the site has the same look and feel when opening non-publishing pages such as document libraries and lists:



    • go to the topsite, then click Site Actions -> Site Settings -> Modify all Site Settings.


    • click Master Page in the Look and Feel Gallery.


    • in the Site Master Page section, select your new Master page (DefaultWithCopyright.master). Then chekc the option Reset all subsites to inherit the Site Master Page setting

Now that you have copied and applied a new Master Page, you can start editing it to add the copyright statement as follows:




  • Locate the DefaultWithCopyright.master page file in the Master Pages and page layouts gallery, then use its quick menu to start editing the file in SharePoint Designer (accept the option to check out the file if asked)


  • Switch to code view, then search for the PlaceHolderMain. this is the place where SharePoint will later put the actual page content.


  • Add a new table row under the PlaceHolderMain segment; that is, add the last three lines in the code segment below:



<tr>
    <td class=’ms-bodyareaframe’ valign=”top” height=”100%”>
      <A name=”mainContent”></A>
    <asp:ContentPlaceHolder id=”PlaceHolderPageDescription” runat=”server”/>
    <asp:ContentPlaceHolder id=”PlaceHolderMain” runat=”server”>
    </asp:ContentPlaceHolder>
    </td>
</tr>

<tr>
    <td colspan=”2″>Copyright 2007 – My Company Name</td>
</tr>




  • Save the Page, check it in, and approve it. open SharePoint site based on this Master page and check that the copyright statement is present now.

Copy a site to Another Site collection with Sharepoint Designer


I always catch myself looking for this information when I need it, so I thaught: why not post it here.




  • Logon as Administrator


  • Open the WSS site to be copied in SharePoint Designer (SPD)


  • in SharePoint Designer, select the menu option Site -> Administration -> Backup Web Site


  • Choose if you want to include subsites. Click OK, then enter the path where the backup files will be saved, and give the backup file a name. Note that the file type will be Content Migration Package (cmp). Click OK to start the backup process; wait for it to complete, then click OK.


  • The you need to create an empty site, that is, a site without a site template. For this, you need to use the STSADM tool. Open a new Command prompt and type the follwoing command to create an ampty site with teh URS http://server1/Sites/abc: stsadm -o createweb -url http://server1/Sites/abc.


  • Open the new site with SPD. Click File -> Open Site and enter or brwose to http://server1/Sites/abc. It will be empty, except for some default folders.


  • Click Site -> Administration -> Restore Web Site, then browse to the cmp file you created in the previous steps and click OK to start restoring the site.


  • open the new site in a web browser and verify that it is to correct.


  • Finally define the permission settings for the restored site, since these settings are not restored.

Prohibit the use of Sharepoint Designer to Edit Sharepoint Sites

If you ever need to prohibit the possibility to edit Sharepoint Sites with Sharepoint Designer, you can edit the following File:


\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\12\template\Site Templates\STS\XML\Onet.xml


Replace the line that starts with <Project Title=”$Resources:onet_TeamWebSite;”  (it should be the second line in the file)


by the following:


<Project Title=”$Resources:onet_TeamWebSite;” Revision=”2″ ListDir=”$Resources:core,lists_Folder;” xmlns:ows=”Microsoft SharePoint”; DisableWebDesignFeatures=”wdfopensite”><!– _locID@Title=”camlidonet1″ _locComment=”{StringCategory=HTX}” –>


Now, save the file and reset IIS (start -> Run -> iisreset)


When you try to open the site now with Sharepoint Designer, you should get a message stating that the web site has been configured to disallow editiing with SharePoint Designer.

Create a site definition from an existing site definition using Visual Studio


I found a link to an excellent article in the “Beginning Sharepoint 2007 Administration” book that is worth mentionning.


It describes how to create a new site definition by copying an exitsing site definition using the Sharepoint Solution Generator for Visual Studio. If you need to create a site definition, then check out the article on Serge van den Oever’s Blog


http://weblogs.asp.net/soever/archive/2006/11/11/Sharepoint-Solution-Generator-_2D00_-part-1_3A00_-create-a-site-definition-from-an-existing-site.aspx

MOSS 2007 Hardware Specifications and Server Sizing


The following article was grabbed from Maina Donaldson’s Blog (http://geekswithblogs.net/MainaD/Default.aspx). You can find the original article and comments on http://geekswithblogs.net/MainaD/archive/2007/10/17/116101.aspx


This article gives a nice overview of the Hardware Specs and Server Sizing you need to consider during your design of a MOSS 2007 environment.


__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 


A Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS) production environment is designed according to projected load, usage pattern, services, content volume and growth projections. There is a lot of information that has been published by Microsoft and others on these topics, but i recently had a need to summarize this for a client, so here are hardware and server sizing guidelines for MOSS – brief, to the point and all in one place.



Virtualized deployments will be covered in a follow-up post.


Guidelines


  • Memory will typically be the first bottleneck on all MOSS server roles.
  • We highly recommend 64-bit for the entire infrastructure. A single web-server, single database server 64-bit environment will support up to 3,000 users. 64-bit offers the following advantages:

    • Memory addressability (up to 1,024 gigabytes vs 4-GB on a 23-bit system)
    • Larger numbers of processors (up to 64 vs. 32 on 32-bit) and more linear scalability per processor
    • Enhanced (faster and wider) bus architecture. This is somewhat analogous to the improvement that broadband connections offer over dial-up connections

      Note: Itanium-based systems are not supported

  • Office SharePoint Server 2007 requires Active Directory services for farm (multi-server) deployments.

Server Roles


A MOSS environment typically consists of at least two physical machines – a Web Server and a Database Server. It is not recommended to deploy MOSS to a one-server production environment. Larger environments, or computing-intensive environments may also include an Application Server role, which may host Excel Calculation Services and/or Indexing Services, or even Project Server 2007.

Web Front End Farm Server


One or more Web FE Serves will be specified for your environment, depending on load and high-availability requirements.


Hardware Specification

 























Processor

2 dual-core 2.5+ GHz
64-bit

Memory

4 GB

Disk Space

15 GB (web server only)

50 GB (if running index service)

Network

1 Gbps connection to other farm machines

56 Kbps or faster to client


Software Pre-Requisites

 




















OS

Windows Server 2003 SP 1, Standard x64 Ed.
+ most recent updates

Software

.NET Framework 2.0 x64

Windows Workflow Foundation (.NET 3.0)

Updates

.NET Framework update KB923197 for x64

.NET Framework update KB925613


Application / Index Server


If a separate Index, Search, or Excel Services server has been specified, use the following guidelines for hardware procurement.


Hardware Specification
















Processor

2 dual-core 2.5+ GHz
64-bit

Memory

8 GB

Disk Space

50GB (pending detailed requirements) *

Network

1 Gbps connection to other farm machines


* The above disk space recommendation can accommodate indexing of around 100GB of content.  Exact disk space requirements also depend on the server role.


Software Pre-Requisites



















OS

Windows Server 2003 SP 1, Standard x64 Ed.
+ most recent updates

Software

.NET Framework 2.0 x64

Windows Workflow Foundation (.NET 3.0)

Updates

.NET Framework update KB923197 for x64

.NET Framework update KB925613



Database Server


While SharePoint 2007 supports SQL Server 2000, I strongly recommend using SQL Server 2005 which displays dramatic performance improvements over SQL 2000.


Hardware Specification
















Processor

2 (or 4) dual-core 2.5+ GHz
64-bit

Memory

16GB for one FE server / 32 GB for MOSS farms

Disk Space

 (see below)

Network

1 Gbps connection to other farm machines
To estimate data storage requirements for a MOSS environment, please use the worksheet below.   Raw Content Size refers to the volume of documents or pages that are to be stored in MOSS. 



Storage Requirements Worksheet







































Raw Content Size

_____

x 2.4

______

OS install
   
4 GB

SQL install
   
.5 GB

MOSS config db
   
1.5 GB

SubTotal
   
______

Min free space

SubTotal / 3
 
______

Total Diskspace Requirement
   

______


Storage Requirements Worksheet Sample







































Raw Content Size

10 GB

x 2.4

22 GB   

OS install
   
4 GB

SQL install
   
.5 GB

MOSS config db
   
1.5 GB

SubTotal
   
28 GB

Min free space

SubTotal / 3
 
9 GB

Total Diskspace Requirement
   
37 GB



Software Pre-Requisites






















OS

Windows Server 2003 SP 1, Enterprise x64 Ed.
+ most recent updates

Software

.NET Framework 2.0 x64

Microsoft SQL Server 2005 x64

Windows Workflow Foundation (.NET 3.0)

Updates

.NET Framework update KB923197 for x64

.NET Framework update KB925613


High Availability Options


Like any computing or application environment, scalability and availability are important factors to consider when deploying a MOSS environment. MOSS supports various options and topologies for scale, alleviating the paing of planning ahead by allowing future addition of a web server, or isolating an application server at a later time.

The question of high availability, however, is critical to ask upfront. When deciding on an infrastructure, customers should answer the following questions to determine if they need hardware redundancy or other high availability options:


  • Is your availability requirement 99% or greater?
  • If the service becomes unavailable, will employees of your organization be unable to reasonably perform their expected job responsibilities?
  • If the service becomes unavailable, will business and customer transactions be halted, leading to loss of business and customers?

If you answered any or all of these questions with “yes”, database redundancy and automatic failover is important for your organization and you should consider the options described below.

Web Front End and Application Server
Network Load Balancing

At the web front-end, high availability can be achieved using two or more active web servers on distinct hardware. These web servers are identical MOSS server instances that are load-balanced using a hardware load-balancing device such as Cisco’s Local Director (CLD), or Big IP.  In the case of hardware failure, the alternate web server will carry the load until the failed server is brought back online.

Virtual Image

In a virtualized deployment (not addressed in this white-paper), a virtual image of the FE web server is base-lined and backed up. In the case of hardware or software failure, the backup image is brought online on a different machine. This solution does not provide automatic failover or high-availability, but may be implemented if scheduled and unscheduled outages are acceptable.
Database Server
Disk Drive

The database server should have at the very least a RAID 5 configuration for disk redundancy, better RAID 10 for increased data recoverability should one or more hard drives fail.  

A SAN or similar shared storage solution typically already accounts for data recoverability and is the preferred approach, if available.

Clustering

Failover (active/passive) clustering provides high availability database solution that addresses availability through redundancy, and performance through additional computing capacity. Clustering requires two distinct processing servers that share a common data store.

Failover clustering can be combined with other high availability methods such as log shipping or mirroring to minimize the loss of data and productivity in case of catastrophic hardware failures.

Mirroring

Database mirroring is a new SQL Server 2005 technology that can deliver high availability and high performance solutions for database redundancy. In database mirroring, transaction log records are sent directly from a principal to a mirror database whenever the principal’s transaction log buffer is written to disk (hardened). This technique can keep the mirror database nearly up to date with the principal, and with no loss of committed data. In the High Availability operating mode, if the principal fails, the mirror server will automatically become a new principal and recover its database. As with log shipping, implementing database mirroring does require additional hardware to be purchased.

Log Shipping

Log shipping automatically sends transaction log backups from a primary database on a primary server instance to one or more secondary databases on separate secondary server instances. The transaction log backups are applied to each of the secondary databases individually. Log shipping requires that additional hardware be purchased (unlike failover clustering).

Below is a table that compares the three supported high-availability database solutions:


 













































Category or Feature

Failover Clustering

Log Shipping

Database Mirroring

Scope of Availability

Server instance

Database

Database

Standby type

Hot

Warm

Hot

Database downtime during failure

30 seconds + database recovery

variable

<10 seconds

Redundant storage locations

No (shared disk)

Yes

Yes

Hardware requirements

Cluster certified servers and storage

Standard servers

Standard servers

Physical distance limit

100 miles

None

None

SQL Server version

All

All

SQL Server 2005 SP1